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Why and How to Make a Breast Milk Bath | Mother Rising

Why and How to Make a Breast Milk Bath | Mother Rising

I am in an unusual season of life where I am not with my kids most weekends, which of course, includes my breastfed toddler. An unexpected side effect is that I now have a lot of pumped milk in my freezer. Sadly, Mercy doesn’t drink it because, I suppose, she prefers it straight from the tap. This has led me on a journey of finding other ways to use breastmilk, and one of them is a breast milk bath.

In this post we will go over why someone would make a breast milk bath and then how to make a breast milk bath. Let’s get started!

Why Make a Breast Milk Bath?

Once I realized my freezer was becoming full of breastmilk that my toddler wasn’t going to drink, I began researching other uses for breastmilk. A good friend of mine suggested a “milky bath” or a breast milk bath. Here’s what I found a breast milk bath to be helpful with.

  • Moisturizing dry skin
  • Healing diaper rash
  • Soothing red, irritated skin
  • Healing scratched skin and other minor skin abrasions
  • Helping take the itch out of bug bites

Frankly, a breast milk bath will do no harm and if you have irritated skin, what have you got to lose other than a little bit of breastmilk? Give it a try, come back and comment and let me know how it went.

The photos below are of my daughters taking a breast milk bath, but the real reason I wanted to make a breast milk bath was for my seven year old son. For years, he has had dry skin – his arms, legs, trunk… everywhere!

Since we have been following the instructions below, including the post bath moisturizer, his dry skin has cleared up considerably. Even the raw, red bumps on the back of his thighs look better! As long as I can, I will make breast milk baths part of our weekly (daily?) routine.

How to Make a Breast Milk Bath

Here are the simple instructions of how to make a breast milk bath. No worries, it’s really easy! I like easy.

Step 1: Get a bag or two of breastmilk out of the freezer, fridge OR pump what you can.

Don't pump and dump! Make a breast milk bath. A breast milk bath is helpful with moisturizing dry skin, healing diaper rash and soothing red, irritated skin

Step 2:  Pour enough breastmilk into the water to make the water cloudy.  You don’t need much! I was feeling generous so I drew a large bath and used around 10 ounces.

Don't pump and dump! Make a breast milk bath. A breast milk bath is helpful with moisturizing dry skin, healing diaper rash and soothing red, irritated skin

Step 3:  Soak as much affected skin as possible. Consider reclining in the tub! The more skin exposed to the breast milk bath, the better.

Don't pump and dump! Make a breast milk bath. A breast milk bath is helpful with moisturizing dry skin, healing diaper rash and soothing red, irritated skin

Step 4:  After a good soak, gently pat skin dry.

Don't pump and dump! Make a breast milk bath. A breast milk bath is helpful with moisturizing dry skin, healing diaper rash and soothing red, irritated skin

Step 5:  To lock the breastmilk in the skin, use a good skin moisturizer like coconut oil.

TIP:  If the amount of breastmilk you have available is limited, consider doing a breastmilk bath in the kitchen sink. Since a sink bath requires less water, you’ll need less breastmilk to make the water cloudy.

TIP:  Don’t skip step 5, moisturizing the skin after the bath! You’ll get more bang for your buck using a moisturizer after a breast milk bath.

TIP:  Don’t PUMP AND DUMP! If you need to pump and dump, for whatever reason, use it in a breastmilk bath instead.

Don't pump and dump! Make a breast milk bath. A breast milk bath is helpful with moisturizing dry skin, healing diaper rash and soothing red, irritated skin

Leave a Comment

Have you ever made a breast milk bath? If so, leave a comment and let me know your experience! I’d love to hear more.

Floral Newborn Milk Bath Photos | Seattle Puyallup Bonney Lake Tacoma Newborn Photographer

Monday 21st of June 2021

[…] your skin soft, as the contains natural exfoliants. Milk baths can even be made with breast milk (see a tutorial here), which is a great alternative to pumping and dumping, or a way to use up expired breast milk from […]

ChantElle

Saturday 9th of May 2020

Hello. I’ve got a question about my son having a milk bath. He has eczema. His eczema flares up much more when I used to have dairy or soya products. Since cutting them out his eczema has cleared up. He still gets some eczema on his chest and under his chin. His skin needs a lot of moisturising. I have so much milk in the freezer. This milk is from January when I used to just eat normally including dairy. Can I still bath my little boy in this milk? Thanks.

Lindsey VanAlstyne

Monday 11th of May 2020

Hey! I honestly am not sure. What do you think about trying it to see what happens?

Krystal

Monday 13th of January 2020

My baby has been having breastmilk baths since she was born. She’s 8 weeks old now and loves her milk bath! It really calms her and it moisturises her skin and gets rid of any spots or redness. I follow with a body massage using coconut oil and this relaxes her so much. Her skin is super soft afterwards and she always sleeps so well after! I would never thought of putting breastmilk in a bath. But after midwives said it’s good for skin as it’s got antibodies in it I thought that you may as well put it in a bath! My freezer was getting really full with milk and I didn’t want to pump and dump so I save it for my baby girl’s bath!

Colleen

Saturday 28th of September 2019

I've read online it's a good deep conditioner for hair but I've also read that's a hoax.. have u ever tried it on your hair during the milk bath?

Lindsey VanAlstyne

Monday 30th of September 2019

I've not, but it would do no harm! I'd love to hear what you think if you try it. (I don't have access to breastmilk anymore.)

Jessie R

Tuesday 4th of June 2019

I've given my son (4 yrs at the time) a milk bath when my daughter was breastfeeding. He'd broken out in the weirdest rash and my milk supply was booming when my daughter was born. We put about 15 ounces in the bath water and his rash was almost gone later that day. I'm currently giving my daughter a milk bath because she's had a nasty diaper rash and the usual creams aren't helping. I'm letting her bathe for as long as possible to help her poor bum.