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Herbal Remedies for Morning Sickness | Mother Rising

Herbal Remedies for Morning Sickness | Mother Rising

Herbal Remedies for Morning Sickness

There are many effective herbal remedies for morning sickness. Herbs are a great solution because herbs are a nutrient dense, bio-available food.

Essentially, our bodies are able to easily digest and absorb vitamins and minerals from herbs. Herbs are full of rich, nourishing and helpful components that, used wisely, can aid in preventing and eliminating morning sickness.

Where to Buy Herbs for Morning Sickness

I buy a lot of my essential oils, herbs and tea from Mountain Rose Herbs. They are a quality company you can trust. (In fact I buy my beeswax and tins to make green salve, everything to make elderberry syrup for babies, and all the ingredients I need to make my facial cleanser, all from Mountain Rose Herbs.)

Mountain Rose Herbs. A Herbs, Health & Harmony Com
Of course, if you have local stores that sell bulk herbs that is a great option as well. I live a good distance from health food stores so purchasing herbs online is typically my best option.

Milk Thistle for Morning Sickness

Because pregnancy encourages a sluggish liver, hyperthyroidism and therefore creates morning sickness, an excellent remedy for the liver and therefore morning sickness is milk thistle extract (standardized to contain at least 70% silymarin).

In Naturally Healthy Pregnancy, author Shownda Parker recommends a daily amount of 280 mg.

Jesse Hawkins also recommends this liver supportive herb in The Handbook of Vintage Remedies.

“By boosting the liver to eliminate toxins and excess hormones from the body, many women experience relief. Within days of beginning milk thistle three times a day, I was back to normal, yet still less than 9 weeks along. For the next 6 weeks, if I missed as little as one dose, nausea began to return. The best part about milk thistle is that it is perfectly safe, with no risks to the baby.”

Milk Thistle Tea for Morning Sickness

Simmer 1 teaspoon crushed seeds in 8 oz of water for 10 minutes.

The dose is 1 to 3 cups daily, or 1 to 3 grams of ground milk thistle seed in capsule form.

*Note that this is not the standardized extract typically used for liver disorders but rather crude preparations of the seeds.

Anise and Fennel Seeds for Morning Sickness

Some women have found comfort in making hot teas with anise and fennel seeds.

Another idea is to simply chew on the seeds whenever you feel queasy.

Mint for Morning Sickness

Mint teas cold or hot can be very soothing to the digestive system. Or blend a few herbs with mint for a nutritious and tasty pregnancy tea.

pregnancy tea rec

Ginger for Morning Sickness

Marijuana for Morning Sickness

Researching morning sickness as much as I have, I was not surprised to find information and stories from women using medical marijuana as a remedy for morning sickness. Here’s what I found.

Many people experiencing profound nausea in scenarios where they are recovering from the effects of procedures such as chemotherapy have found relief from their symptoms using medical marijuana. Some pregnant women have followed suit. However, most women will not go on record to share their story since marijuana is illegal in most places, and they don’t want to risk “getting their kids taken away.”

I understand. I wouldn’t risk it either.

Information on and research into cannabis for use in battling severe morning sickness is limited. Most studies were done in Jamaica, and none of their findings were acknowledged by research institutions in other parts of the world. Their findings suggest that cannabis in and of itself is not harmful to the mother or child.

They have even found children exposed to cannabis in utero to be doing better than children who have not been exposed.

There have been some studies done in the United States, but have (in my opinion) inconclusive data because of variables that could not be controlled. The blurry line developed when some of the pregnant women participating in the study tested positive for marijuana, but also for other drugs, and alcohol. Another factor that consistently threw off the study was that many of the women willing to participate in the study were from lower socioeconomic situations, and consequently had less access to prenatal care. There was just too much going on there to know what
variable caused what finding.

I cannot draw a conclusion on this subject because, obviously, more research is needed. Though it may be helpful, I cannot advocate marijuana use.

Essential Oils for Morning Sickness

One of my favorite morning sickness remedies is aromatherapy. It’s safe, simple and very effective.

I have memories of sitting on my bed sniffing a bottle of wild orange, peppermint and/or lemon essential oils (not all at the same time). I was feeling really terrible, but smelling these essential oils gave me relief.

TIP: Smelling an essential oil right out of the bottle is the easiest way of using essential oils. It doesn’t have to be complicated!

If you find an oil that is working for you, you might look into purchasing a diffuser as an easy way to keep the aroma wafting throughout your home or workspace. A diffuser does this by creating vapor out of a mixture of essential oils and water.

TIP: For a similar effect, smell a freshly sliced lemon. Sniff it when you’re feeling sick, or add it to cold ice water. If it’s a chilly day, add it to your favorite warm tea.

freshstart

Essential Oil Diffuser Blends

The following are two simple and effective essential oil diffuser blends that are perfect for warding off nausea during pregnancy.

diffuser-recipe

Mother Rising Peaceful Blend

6 drops of Wild Orange
2 drops of Lavender

Mother Rising Steady Blend

4 drops of Peppermint
4 drops of Lemon

Please note that I am not an aromatherapist. Consult with your care provider if you have any medical related questions about essential oils. I realize there is a lot of misinformation on the internet about essential oils. Despite the information you may read on other websites, I do not advocate pregnant women to apply essential oils directly or diluted onto the skin, unless under the care of a certified aromatherapist. This is especially true for those in the first trimester.

Ayurvedic Home Remedies for Morning Sickness

Women living in India are less likely to experience morning sickness. What??!!

After discovering this statistic, I began researching Indian resources for morning sickness. What about living in India
allows women to have less morning sickness? Many websites gave the typical advice, but I did find information on natural ayurvedic home remedies (which is basically Hindu alternative medicine).

Here are two ayurvedic recipes for morning sickness.

Remedy #1 (Curry, Lemon and Sugar)

  1. Crush a handful of curry leaves (press them on a sieve and extract their juice)
  2. Take 2 tsp curry leaf juice
  3. Add 1 tsp lemon juice
  4. Mix well
  5. You may add sugar for taste
  6. Drink 2 times every day

Remedy #2 (Mint, Ginger, Lemon and Honey)

  1. Take 1 tsp mint leaves’ juice
  2. Add ½ tsp ginger paste
  3. Add 1 tsp lemon juice
  4. Add 1 tsp honey
  5. Mix well
  6. Drink 2 times every day

Herbal Remedies for Morning Sickness

If you are experiencing morning sickness, herbal remedies are an effective way to manage your symptoms. From ginger mints, teas and aromatherapy you are bound to find a remedy that works for you.

Leave a Comment

Leave a comment on this post and let me know what herbal remedies for morning sickness you have tried. Did it work? Or was it a complete bust?

Anitha

Thursday 5th of April 2018

My daughter is 9 weeks pregnant. She is having terrible nausea and throwing up lots. What can she take. Her afternoons are worse than the mornings

Jacki May

Monday 29th of February 2016

Great article. Susun Weed recommends cannabis during labor as an oxytocic herb.....but I generally leave that out when talking to mamas :)

Matthew Wood and Anne Frye also recommend Peach leaf for hyperemesis. Frye (from her Holistic Midwifery Vol 1) mentions it as a tea, but Wood has seen relief from a tincture applied on the inner wrist (he used it with a mom who couldn't even hold water down).

I really love your blog! You are smart and a wonderful writer. Keep up the excellent work.

Lindsey Morrow

Monday 29th of February 2016

HA! An oxytocic herb. Never heard that one before. Thanks for the info about peach leaf. That's super interesting.